5 Tips for Facebook Pages

by Nathan King


Some useful information for any brand building a Social Media presence:

  1. Include more than your logo on your icon. Facebook icons have a limited width, but you can make them tall. Some businesses have done some very creative treatments and personalization on their icons. Take a look how Dunkin' Donuts includes a "Fan of the Week" and how we were able to include a logo and photograph for Molloy College's Facebook Page.
  2. Facebook is not Twitter. Don't set your Twitter account to automatically post to Facebook every time you Tweet. The types of conversation and content expected on Facebook are different from what is expected on Twitter. Also, having different content on each of these social networks gives people a great reason to follow you on both!
  3. Don't post too often. Don't send too many updates every day or you may run the risk of losing your following. If you begin to clog your followers' newsfeeds, you might be getting in the way of important updates from their friends and family. 
  4. Don't install questionable apps. Not all apps are created equal. Some are scams or post spam on your page. Before installing an app, do a quick search to see if it's legit. Some apps help collect data from your customers, but then sell that data to spammers.
  5. Moderate posts consistently. There's nothing worse than landing on a Facebook page and seeing spam posts. Make sure you check your page often and delete any spam. If you've lost interest in maintaining your page (or don't have the time to do it), consider turning off the ability for people to post on the wall.

Do you have any other tips to share? Please do in the comments section below.

Nathan KingNathan King is a Digital Strategist at Long Island advertising agency Austin & Williams and a leader in Social Media marketing. To read more about Nathan, visit his bio section on the A&W Web site.

Comments – 1 response to “5 Tips for Facebook Pages”

  1. Matt Moss Says:
    Be human. Talk to your community like a normal person and be there when they talk to you. Nothing worse than trying to communicate with a brand and have it feel like your talking to a brick wall.

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